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Hacking Bacteria To Fight Disease

Video   Dec 11, 2019 | Taken from TED-Ed, YouTube

 

Explore how synthetic biologists are programming bacteria to fight cancer by manipulating their DNA.

In 1884, an unlucky patient who had a rapidly growing cancer in his neck came down with an unrelated bacterial skin infection. As he recovered from the infection, the cancer surprisingly began to recede. The infection had stimulated the patient’s immune system.

Today, synthetic biologists program bacteria to safely deliver drugs directly to tumors. How is this possible? Tal Danino investigates.

 
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