We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Microfluidic Systems for Biomarker Analysis and Cancer Diagnosis

Video   May 12, 2014

 

About the Speaker


Martin A. M. Gijs is a professor in the Institute of Microengineering, where he is responsible for the Microsystems Technology Group. His main interests are in developing technologies for novel magnetic devices, new microfabrication technologies for microsystems fabrication in general and the development and use of microfluidics for biomedical applications in particular. AbstractWe first report on a magnetic surface coverage assay, in which ‘large’ (2.8 µm) magnetic beads have contact with ‘small’ (1.0 µm) immobilized magnetic beads via magnetic dipolar interaction to induce specific immunocomplex formation. This attractive magnetic force is carefully balanced with a viscous drag imposed by a microfluidic flow to remove non-specifically bound large magnetic beads. In this way, a fg mL-1 limit of detection was demonstrated for Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in serum, by counting of the number of surface-bound large beads. Subsequently, we report a microfluidic tissue processor that permits accurate quantification of the expression of biomarkers on tissue sections, as enabled by the ultra-rapid and uniform fluidic exchange of the device. An important clinical biomarker for invasive breast cancer is the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). Using our device, we performed tests on invasive breast carcinoma cases expressing various levels of HER2 and demonstrated the clinical potential of microfluidics for accurate biomarker expression analysis. 

 
 
 
 

Recommended Videos

Proteins at Work – The Fascinating World of Proteomics

Video

This video provides a glimpse at the fascinating world of proteomics research, the study of all proteins that form the basis for life. The video was produced for the lab of Professor Albert Heck at Utrecht University and the Netherlands Proteomics Centre.

WATCH NOW


The Microbiome: How Might Gut Bacteria Help Treat Cancer?

Video

The bacteria, fungi and viruses that live inside us are collectively called our microbiome, and they play an important role in our health. But scientists also think that the bacteria in our guts might help some cancers develop and change how these cancers respond to treatment.

WATCH NOW

 

Like what you just watched? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Cancer Research Diagnostics Proteomics & Metabolomics

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE