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Novel Strategies in Single Molecule Sensing using Multiphase Microfluidics

Video   Dec 01, 2015

 

Analytical Sensors plays a crucial role in today’s highly demanding exploration and development of new detection strategies. Whether it be medicine, biochemistry, bioengineering, or analytical chemistry the goals are essentially the same:

1) improve sensitivity

2) maximize throughput

3) and reduce the instrumental footprint.

In order to address these key challenges, the analytical community has borrowed technologies and design philosophies which has been used by the semiconductor industry over the past 20 years. By doing so, key technological advances have been made which include the miniaturization of sensors and signal processing components which allows for the efficient detection of nanoscale object. One can imagine that by decreasing the dimensions of a sensor to a scale similar to that of a nanoscale object, the ultimate in sensitivity can potentially be achieved - the detection of single molecules. This talk highlights novel strategies for the detection of single molecules using multiphase microfluidics.

 
 
 
 

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