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What is Sepsis? (Sepsis Explained in 3 Minutes)

Video   Aug 30, 2018 | Video courtesy of the Global Sepsis Alliance

 

The more people know about sepsis, the safer everyone is.

Save lives and raise awareness by sharing this video, courtesy of the Global Sepsis Alliance, with your friends, family and colleagues.

Prefer to read? See below.

The Global Sepsis Alliance is a non-profit charity organization with the aim to raise awareness of sepsis worldwide and reduce sepsis deaths by 20 % by 2020. 


Every 3-4 seconds, somebody dies of sepsis.

Sepsis is an emergency.

Sepsis is the final common pathway to death from the vast majority of infectious diseases worldwide.

It arises when in combating the infection, the immune system damages a persons’ own tissues and organs.

This can lead to organ failure, and ultimately, death.

Most infections can lead to sepsis. Among them are common infections such as pneumonia, urinary infections, infections in the abdomen, skin or wound infections, or meningitis. Seasonal flu, malaria, Dengue, Yellow fever and Ebola may all result in sepsis.

More than 80% of infections leading to sepsis are contracted outside of the hospital.

Anyone can get sepsis.

People with a weakened immune system are especially at risk. This includes adults over 60, young children under 1, people with chronic disease of the lung, liver, or heart. & people with diabetes or aids, and people without a spleen

But, sepsis can be prevented.

The easiest way to prevent sepsis is preventing infection in the first place which can be done through vaccination and basic hygiene.

If an infection has led to sepsis, it must be recognised quickly, and the source of the infection treated with antibiotics. Early treatment of infections and early recognition of sepsis saves lives.

Sepsis can be detected by symptoms like: 

Slurred speech or confusion

Extreme shivering or muscle pain/fever

Passing no urine all day

Severe breathlessness

It feels like you’re going to die

Skin mottled or discolored

Sepsis is the most preventable cause of death worldwide.

It affects 27-30 million people per year, of whom 6-9 million die. Many survivors face long term consequences such as the loss of digits or limbs, poor memory and concentration/ or post traumatic stress disorder.

It can be prevented by vaccination, sanitation measures such as access to clean healthcare facilities, clean water, clean delivery, and above all, awareness.

You can help end the sepsis crisis. 

Tell your loved ones.

Participate in World Sepsis Day on September 13th every year.

Donate to support us in raising awareness, prevention and research.

While you were watching this video, 55 people died of sepsis.

Sepsis is an emergency. The more people know about sepsis, the safer everyone is.

Stop sepsis, save lives. 

This video is also available in Spanish, Italian, Turkish and German. French and Portuguese are coming soon - check here for updates: https://www.global-sepsis-alliance.org/sepsis/ 

 
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