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Will It Digest? Episode 6 "Cannabis"

Video   Apr 28, 2017

 

Have you ever wondered how the world around us is scientifically analyzed? From food to fuel, the key is preparing the sample. Microwave sample preparation is a proven technique that has been utilized for many years for a wide variety of sample types for elemental analysis by ICP, ICP-MS, or AA. Acid digestion is employed to break down the sample matrix leaving the elements of interest in solution and ready for analysis. CEM microwave digestion systems rapidly break down a wide variety of sample matrices leaving behind a clear solution containing the analytes of interest. CEM helped pioneer the field of microwave-enhanced chemistry and many official methods were developed by chemists using CEM systems. That’s why more chemists trust CEM microwave sample preparation systems than any other system available for microwave digestion. In an effort to show how sample preparation is done, we took your suggestions and created "Will It Digest?". Enjoy.

 
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