We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Who Should Be Vaccinated First To Prevent Spread of New Variants?
News

Who Should Be Vaccinated First To Prevent Spread of New Variants?

Who Should Be Vaccinated First To Prevent Spread of New Variants?
News

Who Should Be Vaccinated First To Prevent Spread of New Variants?

Credit: Maksim Goncharenok/ Pexels
Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Who Should Be Vaccinated First To Prevent Spread of New Variants?"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

During a pandemic like the one caused by SARS-CoV-2, it is impossible to quickly vaccinate the entire population. Which individuals should be vaccinated first? The most fragile in order to reduce their risk of becoming ill? The youngest and most active individuals in order to limit epidemic progression? The decision is further complicated if we adopt an evolutionary standpoint: vaccination induces a selection pressure that can favour certain strains of the virus, or variants, that are resistant to vaccines. Is it possible to choose vaccine strategies that can slow down this evolution? This question is all the more crucial given that vaccine coverage against Covid-19 remains low in certain countries.


On 18 January 2022, scientists from the Centre d’Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive (CNRS/Université de Montpellier/EPHE-PSL/IRD) published a theoretical framework in PNAS that assesses the impact of various vaccination strategies on the rate of emergence for new variants. For instance, in the case of SARS-CoV-2, the strategy of vaccinating older individuals as a priority appears highly effective, as it minimizes both selection for a resistant variant and overall mortality. This study underscores the importance of taking the evolutionary dynamics of the virus into consideration as a complement to an exclusive focus on the dynamics of the epidemic.


Reference: Gandon S, Lion S. Targeted vaccination and the speed of SARS-CoV-2 adaptation. PNAS. 2022;119(3). doi: 10.1073/pnas.2110666119


This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

 


Advertisement